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Cineteca Alameda (photo credit Código San Luis)

Cineteca Alameda

San Luis Potosi, Mexico

First Opened: 27th February 1941 (81 years ago)

Reopened: 6th June 2009

Atmospheric Style: Spanish Courtyard

Architect: Carlos Crombe

Former Name: Cine Teatro Alameda

Website: cinetecaalameda.com.mx Link opens in new window

Address: Av. Universidad 575, San Luis Potosí, Mexico Link opens in new window


Overview

The Alameda opened in late February 1941, screening Seven Sinners Link opens in new window starring Marlene Dietrich and John Wayne. The cinema was built by Alfredo Lasso de la Vega García-Rojas, who had bought the Arriaga family’s farm which previously occupied the site.

The Alameda was designed by architect Carlos Crombe in an Atmospheric style with a Spanish courtyard theme. Crombe took inspiration from the Alameda Theatre in Mexico City.

The cinema was considered to be one of the most modern cinemas in Mexico throughout the 1940s to 1960s, however in 1993 the Alameda closed.

In 2001 the cinema was declared a historical monument by the National Institute of Anthropology and History, and donated to the State Government. Restoration commenced in 2006 with the goal of it becoming home to the Alameda Film Library (Cineteca Alameda). The Alameda reopened in early June 2009.

The twentieth anniversary of the Alameda Film Library and the 80th birthday of the Alameda were celebrated throughout 2021. The Alameda currently seats 1,374 (587 on the main floor level and 787 in the balcony).

The Alameda is notable for its projection booth which is located in the front-center of the balcony. This arrangement is not seen in many theatres however some examples are the Roxy Theatre in New York (opened 1927, demolished 1960), the State Theatre in Philadelphia (demolished in the late 1960s), the extant Ellen Eccles Theatre in Logan, Utah (opened as the Capitol Theatre in 1923), and the extant O2 Academy Brixton in London, England (opened as the Brixton Astoria in 1929).

According to Líder Empresarial Link opens in new window, the Alameda is believed to be the oldest and largest cinema in Mexico.

Further Reading

Online

Historic Photos & Documents
Exterior in the 1940s or 1950s, courtesy <i>Theatre Architecture Database</i> (JPG)
Exterior in the 1940s or 1950s, courtesy Theatre Architecture Database (JPG)
Exterior, date unknown, courtesy <i>Líder Empresarial</i> (JPG)
Exterior, date unknown, courtesy Líder Empresarial (JPG)
Auditorium in the 2000s, courtesy <i>Cineteca Alameda</i> (JPG)
Auditorium in the 2000s, courtesy Cineteca Alameda (JPG)
Files displayed in this section may be subject to copyright; refer to our Copyright Fair Use Statement regarding our use of copyrighted media.

Photos of the Cineteca Alameda

Photo credits are noted where data was available at the time of inclusion. Photos displayed here may be subject to copyright; refer to our Copyright Fair Use Statement regarding our use of copyrighted media and contact us Contact Us with any concerns.

Photos
Cineteca Alameda: Auditorium in 2021, courtesy <i>Código San Luis</i>
Auditorium in 2021, courtesy Código San Luis
Cineteca Alameda: Auditorium in 2021, courtesy <i>Líder Empresarial</i>
Auditorium in 2021, courtesy Líder Empresarial
Cineteca Alameda: Auditorium from Screen, courtesy Google user <i>Alicia Cuellar</i>
Auditorium from Screen, courtesy Google user Alicia Cuellar
Cineteca Alameda: Lobby, courtesy <i>Daniel Esquivel / The Sun of St. Louis</i>
Lobby, courtesy Daniel Esquivel / The Sun of St. Louis


Photographs copyright © 2002-2022 Mike Hume / Historic Theatre Photos unless otherwise noted.

Text copyright © 2017-2022 Mike Hume / Historic Theatre Photos.

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